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Staying Active with Aging Joints and Diabetes

Without properly functioning joints, our bodies would be unable to bend, flex, or even move. A joint is wherever two bones come together, held in place by tendons that cross the joint and attach muscles to a bone on the other side and ligaments that attach to bones on both sides of the joint to stabilize it. The ends of the bones are covered with cartilage, a white substance. Specialized cells there called chondrocytes produce large amounts of an extracellular matrix composed of collagen fibers, proteoglycan, elastin fibers, and water. Tendons and ligaments are also made up of primarily of collagen. Joints can be damaged, however, making movement more difficult or painful. Joint cartilage ca

Exercise Management in Type 1 Diabetes: A Consensus Statement

Above you see part of the first page of a new consensus statement that comes from many of the individuals involved with the creation and launch of the new JDRF PEAK Performance Program, aimed at educating both clinicians and people with type 1 diabetes how to manage the complexities of being active. In my opinion, this recently published consensus statement on exercise and type 1 diabetes is long overdue and much needed. I managed to get the American Diabetes Association to let me chair an updated position statement (see my November blog) and include type 1 diabetes in it but, unfortunately, never just one addressing type 1 and exercise alone so this JDRF one fills a huge void. The past deca

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